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Technology and Innovation

Technologie et innovation




TechInn - ISSN 2399-8571 - © ISTE Ltd

Aims and scope

Objectifs de la revue

Technology and Innovation is multidisciplinary journal. Its objectives are : to analyze systems and scientific and technical paradigms ; study their innovation paths ; discuss the connections of technology to society but also to innovation, examine how innovation disrupts the functioning of organizations and companies nowadays and in the industrial past, study stakeholder strategies (enterprises, laboratories, public institutions, users) in the production, use and diffusion of new technologies, understand the systemics of these technologies and construct scenarios of their potential diffusion and application ; understand how innovation questions our categories of thought and upsets traditional knowledge mapping…and the meaning of innovation.

 

The journal welcomes articles from the following backgrounds : economy, management, history, epistemology and philosophy of techniques and innovation and design engineering.

 

Scientific Board

Laure MOREL (direction)
Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire ERPI
laure.morel@univ-lorraine.fr

 

Angelo BONOMI
CNR-IRCrES, Italie
abonomi@bluewin.ch

 

Sophie BOUTILLIER
Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale
Sophie.Boutillier@univ-littoral.fr

 

Pierre BARBAROUX
Centre de recherche de l’armée de l’air
pierre.barbaroux@ecole-air.fr

 

Romain DEBREF
Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne
romain.debref@univ-reims.fr

 

Camille DUMAT
Université de Toulouse INP-ENSAT
Lab. DYNAFOR INRAE-INP
camille.dumat@ensat.fr

 

Joelle FOREST
INSA de Lyon
joelle.forest@insa-lyon.fr

 

Sophie FOURMENTIN
UCEIV, Université Littoral Cote d’Opale
sophie.fourmentin@univ-littoral.fr

 

 

 

Stéphane GORIA
Centre de recherche sur les médiations
Université de Lorraine
Stephane.goria@univ-lorraine.fr

 

Nathalie JULLIAN
Université Picardie Jules Verne
Nathalie.pawlicki@u-picardie.fr

 

Pierre LAMARD
Université de Technologie
de Belfort-Montbéliard
pierre.lamard@utbm.fr

 

Didier LEBERT
ENSTA Paris
didier.lebert@ensta-paris.fr

 

Thomas MICHAUD
Cnam, Consultant
thomachaud@yahoo.fr

 

Sophie REBOUD
Groupe ESC Dijon-Bourgogne
sophie.reboud@escdijon.eu

 

Jean-Claude RUANO-BORBALAN
Conservatoire national des arts et métiers
jean-claude.ruano_borbalan@cnam.fr

 

Jean-Marc TOUZARD
INRA
jean-marc.touzard@supagro.inra.fr

 

Technologie et innovation est une revue pluridisciplinaire. Ses objectifs sont les suivants : analyser les systèmes et les paradigmes scientifiques et techniques, étudier leurs trajectoires d’évolution, discuter des liens de la Technologie à la société mais aussi de la Technologie à l’innovation, examiner comment les innovations bouleversent le fonctionnement des organisations et des sociétés aujourd’hui et dans le passé industriel, étudier les stratégies des acteurs (entreprises, laboratoires, institutions publiques, usagers) de production, d’utilisation, de diffusion des nouvelles technologies, comprendre la systémique de ces technologies et construire de scenarii sur leur potentiel de diffusion et d’application, étudier comment les innovations questionnent nos catégories de pensée et bousculent la cartographie traditionnelle des savoirs... penser le sens de l’innovation.

Elle accueille des articles en économie, gestion, histoire, sciences de l’information et de la communication, épistémologie et philosophie des techniques, ingénierie de l’innovation et design.

 

Conseil scientifique

Laure MOREL (direction)
Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire ERPI
laure.morel@univ-lorraine.fr

 

Angelo BONOMI
CNR-IRCrES, Italie
abonomi@bluewin.ch

 

Sophie BOUTILLIER
Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale
Sophie.Boutillier@univ-littoral.fr

 

Pierre BARBAROUX
Centre de recherche de l’armée de l’air
pierre.barbaroux@ecole-air.fr

 

Romain DEBREF
Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne
romain.debref@univ-reims.fr

 

Camille DUMAT
Université de Toulouse INP-ENSAT
Lab. DYNAFOR INRAE-INP
camille.dumat@ensat.fr

 

Joelle FOREST
INSA de Lyon
joelle.forest@insa-lyon.fr

 

Sophie FOURMENTIN
UCEIV, Université Littoral Cote d’Opale
sophie.fourmentin@univ-littoral.fr

 

 

 

Stéphane GORIA
Centre de recherche sur les médiations
Université de Lorraine
Stephane.goria@univ-lorraine.fr

 

Nathalie JULLIAN
Université Picardie Jules Verne
Nathalie.pawlicki@u-picardie.fr

 

Pierre LAMARD
Université de Technologie
de Belfort-Montbéliard
pierre.lamard@utbm.fr

 

Didier LEBERT
ENSTA Paris
didier.lebert@ensta-paris.fr

 

Thomas MICHAUD
Cnam, Consultant
thomachaud@yahoo.fr

 

Sophie REBOUD
Groupe ESC Dijon-Bourgogne
sophie.reboud@escdijon.eu

 

Jean-Claude RUANO-BORBALAN
Conservatoire national des arts et métiers
jean-claude.ruano_borbalan@cnam.fr

 

Jean-Marc TOUZARD
INRA
jean-marc.touzard@supagro.inra.fr

 

Forthcoming issues

Forthcoming papers

Journal issues


Recent articles

[FORTHCOMING] Remote working and innovation: The trust needed to invent new ways of working together?
Sandrine Virgili, Frédéric Bornarel, Hélène Delacour

Recent pandemics have forced most companies to experiment with remote working to varying degrees. Despite the exceptional productivity of employees in this crisis context and the desire of employees to continue working remotely, the most innovative companies are making a strong case for more face-to-face work. This movement, called ”return to the office" is seen as the only way to create effective collaboration in innovative teams. In this paper, we show that the „return to the office‟ argument is based on a narrow conception of face-to-face trust or affect-based trust, as the main driver of collaborative dynamics. On the contrary, drawing on trust and innovation management research, we emphasize that distance does not limit the production of effective trust for innovative teams. Moreover, we propose a new articulation between two forms of trust, swift trust and reflective trust, i.e., the “swift reflective trust”, to support a new hybrid way of working that fosters collaboration and innovation.


[FORTHCOMING] The French army’s Red Team program, a bet on the dysperformativity of science fiction
Thomas Michaud

The French army’s Red Team program consists of creating science fiction stories with the aim of anticipating conflicts that could threaten the territory by 2030-2060. Part of the trend of institutional science fiction, it is based on the capacity to arouse the cognitive strangeness dear to Darko Suvin and to create novum (imaginary technologies) vectors of difficulties, but also of solutions in the wars of the future. If certain novum have a performative function, the diegesis, that is to say the spatiotemporal environment of the story, takes on more of a dysperformative dimension. These stories seek to arouse the reaction of soldiers to imaginary dangers so that they implement strategies in advance to avoid their occurrence. Science fiction authors capture the unconscious of organizations and reveal their prophetic imaginaries. Innovism is also a true ideology pragmatically using the imaginary to question the established order and generate new ideas that are sources of creative destruction. The Red Team also brings the French army into a regime of historicity oriented towards the future, more than towards the battles of the past. Science fiction is also a paradoxical genre, involving a specific interpretation of reality and the future. It is therefore appropriate to question the advantages and possible disadvantages linked to the use of a paradoxical vision of the future in the development of an organization’s strategies aimed above all at efficiency and pragmatism.


[FORTHCOMING] Qualificative artificial intelligence (QuAI). When artificial intelligence integrates all the diversity of human critical thinking
Florin Paun, Ingrid Vaileanu, Thomas O’neal, Laurent Chaudron

In the light of the contributions of the logics of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and disruptive innovations [ADA, 18] and research issues on solutions for participatory qualification of impact data recalling older questions and analyzes including the Condorcet paradox [CON 85] and the incompleteness theorem of Arrow [ARR 51] or of Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen [SEN 70] on the evolution of economic models towards an economy of well-being with collective choice we propose possible responses for co-construction of new highly collaborative open qualification tools and processes [PAU 12]. By taking into account the diversity of open innovation actors to integrate the capabilities augmented by AI, we manage to integrate ex ante into highly democratic processes and AI tools the diversity of evolving determinants of opinions on the perceived impacts on everything. topics of common interest expressed. This leads our research towards the discovery [PAU 22] of a third typology of AI in addition to the symbolic one and the connective one: the Qualificative Artificial Intelligence (QuAI) - with the ability to integrate human critical thinking. New spaces – QuAI tools, collaborative open qualification processes – can thus lead to optimal choices through collaboration and the collective creation of relevance and trust, particularly through new dynamic capabilities that potentially create disruptive innovations. Several usage functionalities are identified in terms of developments towards a functionality economy [VAI, 20]. and the democratization of access and contribution to impact data aimed at disruptive innovative solutions and tools for resilience [SCH 22] considering the multifaceted (economic, climate change, confidence) crises [PAU 09, 12, 18].


[FORTHCOMING] Digitalisation in agriculture : towards an agroecological transformation ?
Eléonore Schnebelin

Both private and public actors promote digitalisation as a way of contributing to the agroecological transition of agriculture. However, the actual effects of digital technology on the agroecological transition is a matter of controversy. The objective of this article is to investigate how digitalisation affects and interacts with the diversity of agricultural models. To do so, it proposes an institutional economic and multi-level analysis of innovation system, implemented through a methodology that combines quantitative and qualitative analysis. At the level of the Agricultural Innovation System, it demonstrates that depending on their involvement in organic or conventional farming, actors do not perceive the same potential and risks and enact digitalisation differently. Organisations that promote digital in agriculture seem not to perceive this heterogeneity. At farm level, based on 98 interviews with field crop farmers in Occitanie, I construct digital technology use profiles. Current digital use mostly supports weak or symbolic ecologisation, tied with the industrialization of farms, which is characterised by expansion, specialization, the growing of outsourcing activities and salaried workforce as well as a deeper value-chain integration. This article highlights that, depending on the agricultural model to which the actors belong, they do not have the same perceptions and uses of digital technology. Digitalisation does not appear to be the result of so-called ’pioneering’ behaviour, but depends on the diversity of models and paradigms, in interaction with a socio-economic system that proposes, encourages or even imposes these technologies. Current digitalisation presents several forms of opposition to the agroecological transition of agriculture, whether in terms of techniques, objectives, reasoning, temporal dynamics or political and social issues. However, hybridisations of digitalization and ecologisation seem possible in the case of industrial forms of ecologisation. A deeper contribution of digitalisation to ecologisation would imply rethinking its technical, economic and political models.


[FORTHCOMING] Wargaming, a serious war game practice, simulation and digital technology opportunities
Stéphane Goria

The professional or semi-professional practice of wargames is called wargaming. It encompasses numerous forms of war simulation that share the commonality of being serious games based on data derived from the field and/or aimed at collecting new data. Their use can be educational, preparatory for planification, exploratory, or prospective. Wargame can be played in a physical or computerized format, or even in a hybrid form combining these alternatives. Drawing on a literature review on this subject, this article aims to shed light on the different categories of wargames practiced by the military, as well as the advantages, disadvantages, and risks of physical wargames compared to digital ones.


Value chains. New analyses from the bioeconomy perspective
Blandine Laperche, Aliénor de Rouffignac, Nathalie Jullian

The notion of a “value chain”, developed by the French school of industrial economics in the second half of the 20th century, is currently enjoying a revival – the fragmentation of economic activities is being called into question, interest in sustainable development is growing, and scientific and technical progress is opening up opportunities for the emergence of value chains rooted in local areas. This special issue of Technologie et Innovation analyzes the revival of value chains from a bioeconomic perspective, the bioeconomy being a field of activity based on the valorization of biomass. After presenting the founding works, this introductory article analyzes the revival of work in the specific context of the bioeconomy, and develops the economic, environmental and political stakes involved in the development of biosourced value chains. The final section presents the articles included in this issue.


Biomass as the driving force behind the green economy: the example of the flax sector in maritime Flanders
François Delattre

Replacing fossil fuels with renewable materials will be at the heart of the climate and economic challenges of the coming years. Whether for the production of energy or manufactured products, the billions of tons of oil extracted each year will have to be replaced by large-scale biomass exploitation. Taking into account environmental constraints, the tasks of intensifying biomass production and of integrating it into the bio-economic sphere are not without their pitfalls, as they run counter to sustainable development and certain principles of the eco-economy. In this context, the widespread use of biomass must involve the contribution of all the local and regional resources. Flax, a historic and versatile fiber, is a good example of sustainable production that is both regional and global in scope. It offers major economic development opportunities that a region like French Flanders must seize.


Essential oils: the renaissance of natural and sustainable ingredients
Miriana Kfoury, Sophie Fourmentin

The use of essential oils dates back to ancient times. Between the 1930s and 1960s however, they lost popularity to synthetic chemicals. But now – essential oils are making a comeback. The global essential oils market has grown steadily in the last decades thanks, in particular, to the rise in demand for natural compounds. As a matter of fact, these aromatic plant extracts have become unavoidable raw materials in the development of sustainable and eco-friendly products. This is not only due to their aromatic properties, but also thanks to their multi-purpose benefits and broad spectrum of action against micro-organisms, insects, etc. This article presents the renaissance and development of the essential oils market, focusing on the French sector. It then summarizes the factors that could influence this sector, such as those that determine the expansion of the use of essential oils in aromatherapy, the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, as well as plant health products. It also discusses constraints that could weaken the sector, such as climatic variations, price hikes or the emergence of new regulations. Finally, we give a brief overview of the importance of molecular encapsulation in cyclodextrins in order to overcome the limitations associated with the intrinsic properties of essential oils.


Adding value to hemp in France: From historical production trends to new cannabinoid outlets
Aliénor de Rouffignac, Jérémie Bastien, Romain Debref

This article examines the mutation of the historical French hemp production industry caused by the authorization of economic valorization of the hemp flower for its THC and CBD molecules. We demonstrate that sociotechnical controversies and existing uncertainty limit the perspectives of the circular bioeconomy concept proposed by the European Union, which aims to valorize the entire plant. We combine innovation, industry, and dominant design theories to understand how the historical dominant design responds to these pressures. After a brief historical review, we first present the historical dominant design of the hemp industry in France and its cascade production organization inspired by the wood industry. Then, we show its differences with the one dedicated to the valorization of these molecules of interest derived from the flower. Two results arise from this study. On the one hand, our findings demonstrate the existence of a new production organization based on "inverted cascade production" working on new productive and innovative models. On the other hand, the implementation of a strategy encouraging the circular bioeconomy and the pursuit of zero waste generates a cohabitation of the historical dominant design with another emerging design.


Recovery of roadside biomass: The contribution of demonstrators to the deployment of a sustainable supply chain
Brunelle MARCHE, Mauricio CAMARGO, Christophe BACHMANN

Our current context, which is marked by the acceleration of climate change, the scarcity of resources and geopolitical tensions, calls for a review of the French energy strategy, with biomass-energy as the main source of renewable energy. The roadsides along French roads make up nearly 5,000 km² of the territory and constitute a biomass potential that has not yet been exploited. Thus, if one is to look at roadsides from a new perspective, and consider them as a potential source of sustainable bioeconomy, then a change in practices will be required in order to be able to better exploit this potential. Several studies have highlighted the importance of territorial demonstrators for the implementation of practices and emerging supply chains. With this in mind, this article proposes a conceptual framework for the implementation of a demonstrator for the sustainable management of roadsides for valorization purposes, based on the cross-referencing of information taken from the literature on demonstrators and the sustainable sector.

Editorial Board

Editor

Dimitri UZUNIDIS
Research Network on Innovation, Paris
Dimitri.Uzunidis@univ-littoral.fr

 

Editor in Chief

Smaïl AÏT-EL-HADJ
Institut Textile et Chimique
Université de Lyon
smail.aitelhadj@itech.fr

 

Co-Editors

Camille AOUINAIT
Réseau de Recherche sur l’Innovation
camille.aouinait@gmail.com

Bertrand BOCQUET
Université de Lille
Bertrand.Bocquet@univ-lille.fr

Laurent DUPONT
ENSGSI-ERPI – Université de Lorraine
l.dupont@univ-lorraine.fr

Blandine LAPERCHE
Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale
Clersé
laperche@univ-littoral.fr

Cédric PERRIN
Université Évry Val d’Essonne
cp2002@orange.fr

Schallum PIERRE
Institut intelligence et données (IID)
Université de Laval
Canada
schallum.pierre@iid.ulaval.ca

Corinne TANGUY
Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté
corinne.tanguy@dijon.inra.fr

 


Charte éthique


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